Literature Review – 1st Draft

There have been many studies on the Evolution of Visual Effects and the impact it has had on the film industry. Visual Effects has developed throughout the decades and due to this evolvement, many feel that it is taking over the film industry. Naturally due to this general feeling amongst both the general public and filmmakers alike, there have been Articles, Books and Journals discussing this matter.

Kathleen Grace stated, “Filming always relied on tools to visually enhance or portray scenes that didn’t naturally exist, that’s been going on since the early days in cinema”[1]. However a short article online suggests that, “Despite the immense success of Visual Effects, there is a growing feeling among many people and filmmakers alike that Digital Effects are eroding the quality of some films.”[2] Visual Effects has grown over the years and will continue to progress in the coming decades. This is a topic, which has caused a widespread debate.

John Dykstra (one of the major VFX supervisors in the industry today), in The Visual Effects Producer, once defined a Visual Effects shot as “two or more elements of film combined into a single image”[3]. This statement was made before optical printers where replaced by computers. Once this replacement took place, he then altered his definition by saying “With the advent of Digital imaging, that could be considered two or more subjects captured in a separate media and made to appear as if they where photographed together”[4].

There have been many Visual Effects creatures and pioneers. The pioneers of the Visual Effects Industry, such as George Melies, was a filmmaker between 1890s until the 1920’s and made the worlds first science fiction move, A Trip To The Moon. Edwin S.Porter “Who created the exposure in separate areas of the frame”[5] and the Lumièe brothers who where “French inventors and pioneer manufactures of photographic equipment who devised an early motion – picture camera and projector called the cinematographic”[6].

Due to the growth of technology, there are no boundaries in what film studios can create when it comes to Visual Effects, however many filmmakers are taking it for granted. Though there are many people who believe that Visual Effects is taking over the film industry, I argue that there is a way of having a heavily based Visual Effects film.

[1]Grace, K. (2014) Are films these days relying too much on CGI?. Available at: https://www.quora.com/Are-films-these-days-relying-too-much-on-CGI (Accessed: 20 October 2015).

[2] Are Viusal Effects Dramatically Improving Film or mistakenly Damaging Film? (2013) Available at: http://www.ukessays.com/services/example-essays/film-studies/visual-effects-improving-damaging.php (Accessed: 20 October 2015).

[3] Finance, C. L. and Zwerman, S. (2010) The Visual Effects Producer: Understanding the Art and Business of VFX. Amsterdam: Elsevier/Focal Press, p.4.

[4] Finance, C. L. and Zwerman, S. (2010) The Visual Effects Producer: Understanding the Art and Business of VFX. Amsterdam: Elsevier/Focal Press, p.4.

[5]Venkatasawmy, R. (2012) The Digitization of Cinematic Visual Effects: Hollywood’s Coming of Age. United States: Lexington Books, p.168.

[6] EarlyCinema.com (no date) Available at: http://www.earlycinema.com/pioneers/lumiere_bio.html (Accessed: 20 October 2015).

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